Site of Reversible Destiny — YORO

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Elliptical Field, 2013

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, 2013

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, 2013

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Critical Resemblance House

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Reversible Destiny Office, 2013

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Reversible Destiny Officeinterior, 2013

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Gifu, map

Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, Birds-eye view of Elliptical Field

Arakawa and Gins’ Site of Reversible Destiny—Yoro, is a created landscape containing a series of pavilions, undulating planes, shifting colors, and disorienting spaces that the artists presented to visitors as a place of purposeful experimentation. The work is part of the larger Yoro Park, located in Yoro, Gifu Prefecture, and opened to the public in 1995.

The first pavilion encountered is the Reversible Destiny Office (added later in 1997) that contains an uneven pastel colored maze and a ceiling that mirrors the design of the floor. The Critical Resemblance House is the next building in the park and also includes a maze with walls bisecting furniture and a map of Gifu Prefecture forming its roof. The Elliptical Field encompasses the rest of the park and is set in a concave basin in the foothills of the local mountains.

More pavilions (referred to as Architectural Fragments) are set in the terrain of the Elliptical Field and have names such as Exactitude Ridge, Trajectory Membrane Gate, Zone of Clearest Confusion, Mono no Aware Transformer, and Imaging Navel. Additionally, the Elliptical Field contains an intricate network of 148 paths and 5 maps of Japan placed at different scales throughout the landscape. The vegetation includes 24 different breeds of herbs selected by Arakawa and Gins to emphasize the changing of seasons.

Arakawa and Gins believed that changes in bodily perception would lead to changes in consciousness. Consequently, they developed architecture and constructed environments that challenge the body as a way to "reverse our destinies." Arakawa and Gins wish for visitors to explore the site like children and to reorient perceptions and discover the unlimited possibilities of the body.

PROJECT SPECIFICS:

• Completed in 1995

• Size: 195,000 sq ft / 18,100 sq m

• Program: Public Park

• Location: Yoro-Park, Gifu Prefecture, Japan

For more information please visit:                        http://www.yoro-park.com