Categories
Newsletter Research

Distraction Series, 4: Segue Series Reading at Double Happiness

Dear friends,

With the launch of The Saddest Thing Is That I Have Had to Use Words: A Madeline Gins Reader, edited by Lucy Ives, we wanted to take the opportunity to share with everyone more of Madeline’s poetry and other writings. Some of you may already be aware that a number of audio recordings of Madeline’s public readings and lectures are available on PennSound, a wonderful UPenn project that produces new audio recordings and preserves existing audio archives related to poetry. Thanks to this incredible resource, we can all listen to Madeline read some of her writing aloud, which adds considerably to the experience of engaging with her poetry in particular. 

For Distraction Series 4, we are highlighting Madeline Gins’s Segue Series reading at Double Happiness, NYC, that took place roughly 19 years ago on May 19, 2001. We especially loved this set of readings that beautifully shows Madeline’s profound ability to be serious while maintaining a sense of play. In this selection, she begins with a series of poems on the Krebs Cycle, which she states she “does not want any biochemist to declare as cute,” and intersperses them with poems about eating Spaghetti, seemingly lighthearted but deeply related, and rich with a touch of melancholy and a soupçon of joy. Please immerse yourself and move on to other readings!

Yours in the reversible destiny mode,
Reversible Destiny Foundation and ARAKAWA+GINS Tokyo office

 

Top image: Madeline Gins, 2009, photographed by Maurice Mikkers
Bottom image: Storefront display of What the President will Say and Do!! by Madeline GIns, 1984

Categories
Newsletter Research

Distraction Series, 3: the world premiere performance of Neon Dance’s Puzzle Creature,

Dear friends,

For the third iteration of our Distraction Series, we are pleased to share a full-length recording of the world premiere performance of Neon Dance’s Puzzle Creature, which took place at Kamigo Clove Theatre during the Echigo-Tsumari Triennale, Niigata Prefecture, Japan, on September 15th, 2018. This immersive, multi-disciplinary dance work was inspired by the architecture and philosophy of Arakawa and Madeline Gins. 

Since 2017, London-based group Neon Dance has been studying and exploring the “architectural body”, a concept elaborated by Arakawa and Madeline Gins in their 2002 book of the same name. Research assistance was provided by the ARAKAWA+GINS Tokyo office, Japan, and the Reversible Destiny Foundation, New York. Neon Dance Artistic Director and Choreographer Adrienne Hart’s archival research and site visits to the build works of Arakawa+Gins in both New York and Japan came together in the creation of Puzzle Creature

Three exquisite dance artists drive this 60-minute performance with wearable artefacts created by the award-winning artist Ana Rajcevic forming curious imprints of choreographed action. Puzzle Creature is accompanied by a newly commissioned score for 8 speakers by Oxford based composer Sebastian Reynolds, the work features integrated British and Japanese Sign Language and audio description from Louise Fryer. Organisms that person (you and I) are invited to step inside an inflatable set design by Numen / For Use as the black box theatre is transformed into a unique immersive space shared by both audience and performer. – Neon Dance

Thanks to the generosity of Neon Dance, Puzzle Creature will be available to stream through the end of June, 2020. We hope this enriches your experience of your own “architectural body”!

Yours in the reversible destiny mode,
Reversible Destiny Foundation and ARAKAWA+GINS Tokyo office
 

(image: Neon Dance live at Colston Hall, photographed by Miles Hart)

Categories
Newsletter Research

Distraction Series, 2: We

Dear friends,

In this second installment of our Distraction Series, we are sharing Nobu Yamaoka’s documentary film, WE (2011), featuring Madeline Gins. This film follows Madeline from her studio at 124 West Houston Street to the Bioscleave House in East Hampton, NY, offering another opportunity to spend time with Arakawa+Gins’s reversible destiny architecture. Throughout the film, Madeline provides an intimate look into her extensive, decades-long study of the body, undertaken with Arakawa, as we watch a family explore, navigate, and react to the challenging terrain of Bioscleave House. Thanks to the director’s generosity, this 60 minute film will be available through the end of June, 2020. In case you haven’t had a chance to watch it yet, Children Who Won’t Die (2010) is also available through June via our website.

We hope you enjoy WE (2011) and will be in touch again with another distraction in two weeks’ time! 

Yours in the reversible destiny mode,
Reversible Destiny Foundation and Arakawa+Gins Tokyo office


(Image: Madeline Gins at 124 W Houston Street, New York, 2002)

Categories
Newsletter Research

Distraction Series, 1: Children Who Won’t Die

Dear Friends,

In these uncertain times, strength and solace can be found in belonging to a community and we wanted to take the opportunity to thank you for being a part of ours. At this time, we are all discovering new ways to access and explore art and its potential. As our contribution, the Reversible Destiny Foundation along with ARAKAWA+GINS Tokyo office is pleased to introduce our Distraction Series, a biweekly newsletter with links to a variety of A+G projects.

Today, we are sharing Nobu Yamaoka’s 2010 documentary film, Children Who Won’t Die, which introduces the utopian vision of Arakawa and Gins with a focus on the Reversible Destiny Lofts Mitaka in Tokyo, a culmination of their research into the way the body interacts with the architectural space that surrounds it. With extensive footage of Arakawa speaking about the project, along with first-hand accounts from residents of the Lofts, Children Who Won’t Die offers a look into how the challenging environment of the lofts shifted each person’s experience of daily life, opening up into a more general meditation on life and death. We hope you enjoy it!

Wishing you all the best in the (remote) reversible destiny mode,
Reversible Destiny Foundation and ARAKAWA+GINS Tokyo office

Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

The Future Starts Here

Arakawa + Gins is in The Future Starts Here at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom.

The exhibition will highlight “100 Projects shaping the world of tomorrow” – groundbreaking technologies and designs currently in development in studios and laboratories around the world. Visitors will be guided by a series of ethical and speculative questions to connect the subject matter to the choices that we all face in our everyday lives. 

On view May 12 through November 4, 2018.

Victoria & Albert Museum
Cromwell Road, Knightsbridge 
London SW7 2RL
United Kingdom

T. +44 20 7942 2000

For more information please visit the exhibition website

Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient

Drawing for ‘Container of Perceiving’, 1984. © 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins. Photographed by Nicholas Knight

Columbia GSAPP’s Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery presents an exhibition of architectural drawings, writings, and research by Arakawa and Madeline Gins.

The exhibition Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient traces the emergence of architecture as a wellspring of creativity and theoretical exploration for the artist Arakawa (1936-2010) and poet and philosopher Madeline Gins (1941-2014). 

In the early 1960s, Arakawa and Madeline Gins began a remarkably original and prolific collaboration that spanned nearly five decades and encompassed painting, installations, poetry, literature, architecture, urbanism, philosophy, and scientific research. Complementing their independent artistic and literary practices, Arakawa and Gins’ creative partnership launched with visual, semiotic, and tactile experiments that questioned the limits and possibilities of human perception and consciousness. During the 1980s—a critical juncture in their careers—this line of inquiry became increasingly spatial as Arakawa and Gins together developed a series of speculative architectural projects that sought to challenge the bodily and psychological experience of users. Through these investigations, the artists began to articulate their concept of reversible destiny, arguing for the transformative capacity of architecture to empower humans to resist their own deaths.

The exhibition examines this pivotal exploratory period through a stunning array of original drawings—many exhibited for the first time—as well as archival material and writings that illuminate the working methods and wide-ranging research interests of Arakawa and Gins. It uncovers a little-known body of visionary work that anticipated the artists’ subsequent commitment to architecture and their realization of various “sites of reversible destiny,” including Ubiquitous Site-Nagi’s Ryoanji (1994, Okayama, Japan); Yoro Park (1995, Gifu, Japan); Reversible Destiny Lofts Mitaka (2005, Tokyo, Japan); and Bioscleave House (2008, East Hampton, New York).

Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient features over 40 hand drawings, an architectural model, and archival material including ephemera, research materials, poetry, manuscripts, photographs, slides, and other items drawn from the Estate of Madeline Gins.

Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient is organized by GSAPP Exhibitions. It is made possible in part by the Estate of Madeline Gins, and is organized in partnership with the Reversible Destiny Foundation. 

Curators: Irene Sunwoo, Director of Exhibitions, and Tiffany Lambert, Assistant Director of Exhibitions
Exhibition Design: Norman Kelley (Carrie Norman & Thomas Kelley)

 

Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery
Columbia University 
Buell Hall
1172 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027

Opening Reception: Friday, March 30, 6:30 – 8.30pm

Gallery hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm

For more information please visit: www.arch.columbia.edu

Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

Shonky: the Aesthetics of Awkwardness

Artist John Walter curates the new Hayward Touring exhibition Shonky: The Aesthetics of Awkwardness​, ​opening at the MAC in Belfast before embarking on a national tour to Dundee Contemporary Arts (DCA) and Bury Art Museum and Sculpture Centre. The exhibition aims to explore the nature of visual awkwardness through the work of artists and architects Arakawa and Gins; Cosima von Bonin; Niki de Saint Phalle; Benedict Drew; Justin Favela; Duggie Fields; Louise Fishman; Friedensreich Hundertwasser; Kate Lepper; Andrew Logan; Plastique Fantastique; Jacolby Satterwhite; Tim Spooner ​and John Walter. 

Shonky is a slang term meaning corrupt or bent, shoddy or unreliable, standing here for a particular type of visual aesthetic that is hand-made, deliberately clumsy and lo-fi, against the slick production values of much contemporary art. The exhibition proposes a more celebratory definition of ‘shonkiness’ and showing how it can be used for critical purposes in the visual arts to explore issues including gender, identity, beauty and the body. By drawing together artists and architects whose work has not previously been exhibited together or discussed within the same context, Shonky will allow for new ways of thinking that privilege shonkiness over other aesthetic forms that have dominated recent visual culture. 

In a series of conceptual rooms, Shonky explores this aesthetic across a range of media including paintings, sculpture, video, architecture and performance. These are shown alongside the architectural model and drawings of Inflected Arcade House by experimental architectural duo Arakawa and Gins​, ​who believed that their unusually designed houses with features such as sloping floors, curiously shaped rooms and functionless doors could have life-extending effects on their residents. 

The exhibition is accompanied by a new illustrated catalogue, featuring an essay by John Walter and a contribution by Zoë Strachan & Louise Welsh.

 

Tour details:

The MAC, Belfast, October 20, 2017 – January 14, 2018

Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, March 10 – May 27, 2018

Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, Bury, June 23 – September 15, 2018

 

For more information:

https://themaclive.com/exhibition/shonky-the-aesthetics-of-awkwardness

Categories
Events Programs

Encounters with Arakawa and Madeline Gins

A half-day conference on the occasion of the opening of the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery exhibition Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient. The event convenes architects, artists, historians and writers to offer fresh interpretations of Arakawa and Gins’ work and theories in the context of contemporary practices and scholarship.

Time: 1PM

Date: Friday March 30, 2018

Location:
Wood Auditorium
Avery Hall
Columbia University
1172 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027

For more information please visit: www.arch.columbia.edu

 

Among the conference participants are:


Amale Andraos, Dean of Columbia GSAPP and co-founder of WORKac;
Adrienne Hart, Artistic Director/Choreographer of Neon Dance (London), who is developing a new dance piece that draws on the life and work of Arakawa and Gins;
Momoyo Homma (Tokyo), Director Arakawa + Gins Tokyo Office (Coordinologist, Inc.);
Lucy Ives (New York), an author who is currently editing a collection of writings by Gins;
Andrés Jaque (Madrid/New York), founder of Office for Political Innovation;
Ed Keller (New York), Assoc Prof of Design Strategies & Director of the Center for Tranformative Media, Parsons The New School for Design;
Thomas Kelley and Carrie Norman (Chicago/New York), founders of architectural and design office Norman Kelley and exhibition designers of Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient;
Léopold Lambert (Paris), The Funambulist editor and architect, who has written extensively on Arakawa and Gins’ partnership and worked closely with Gins in her later years;
Spyros Papapetros (New York), Associate Professor, History and Theory of Architecture, Princeton University;
Julian Rose (New York), formlessfinder;
Jenna Sutela (Berlin), Visual Artist;
Miwako Tezuka (New York), art historian who is Consulting Curator at Reversible Destiny Foundation/Estate of Madeline Gins;
Troy Conrad Therrien (New York), Curator, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, Guggenheim Museum

 

Organized by Columbia GSAPP Exhibitions.
Free and open to the public.

 

The exhibition Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient is on view from March 30 – June 16 2018 at Columbia GSAPP’s Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery.

Gallery hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 12 – 6pm

Portrait of Arakawa and Madeline Gins, Office 124 West Houston Street, New York, 2000, photographed by Dimitris Yeros
Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

Invisible Cities: Architecture of Line

Study for Blank No.2, 1981. © 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins. Photograph: Nicholas Knight

Waddington Custot is pleased to present Invisible Cities, curated by Flavia Frigeri. Taking its title from Italo Calvino’s novel, Le città invisibili, this exhibition brings together an international group of artists who, in different ways, explore concepts of the ideal city and discover the necessary coexistence of the real and the imagined. The exhibition includes drawing, painting and sculpture by Giorgio de ChiricoFausto MelottiMaria Helena Vieira da SilvaGegoArakawaGiulio Paolini and Tomás Saraceno.

Calvino’s Le città invisibili, published in 1972, imagines a fictional conversation between the Venetian explorer, Marco Polo, and Kublai Khan, the 13th century ruler of the Mongol Empire. Polo describes a series of wondrous cities which are geographically unspecific, yet imbued with glimpses of reality.

In the exhibition, the closest literal reference to a city is found in the ‘metaphysical’ cityscapes of Giorgio de Chirico (b. 1888, Volos, Greece; d. 1978, Rome, Italy). Calvino described de Chirico’s dream-like setting as a ‘city of the mind’; the steep perspective of an Italianate portico becomes surreal, surrounded by awkward shadows and melancholic skies.

Alternately, the lyrical, metal sculptures of Fausto Melotti (b. 1901, Rovereto, Italy; d. 1986, Milan, Italy) embodied, for Calvino, his most abstract cities. Calvino met Melotti while writing Le città invisibili and Melotti’s sculpture became central to Calvino’s description of his ‘thin city’. The writer saw in these sculptures the stripped back, essential core of modernist architecture. In Calvino’s words, Melotti’s sculptures realised what a utopian city could be: ‘cities on stilts, spider web cities’. The artist was presented with a copy of Invisible Cities, inscribed by the author, ‘For Fausto Melotti, the thin cities and all the others in this book, which [are] also yours….’

In the paintings of Maria Helena Vieira da Silva (b. 1908, Lisbon, Portugal; d. 1992, Paris, France) the physical architecture of the cityscape is splintered. She used ‘floating’ lines to draught architectural skeletons and achieved a profound illusion of space. She noted, ‘I want to paint what is not there as though it existed.’ As Polo recalled cities from memory, so Vieira da Silva’s imagined structures and landscapes were constantly shifting, as distant recollections.

Gego (b. 1912, Hamburg, Germany; d. 1994, Caracas, Venezuela), in a series of Drawings without Paper, ‘liberated’ line from the constraints of two-dimensions. Her drawings describe true volume and space. Gego trained and worked as an architect, but her sculpture went beyond prescribed ideas of structure and the urban to more ethereal and abstract forms, linear environments hanging in space.

Structure described through a reduction to the essential line is central to Calvino’s thought and this exhibition. Of the work of Arakawa (b. 1936, Nagoya, Japan; d. 2010, New York City, USA), Calvino wrote, ‘…lines belong to bundles of lines which may have a common point of departure or else may converge in a point, in which case they create perspectives.’ Maps, floorplans, and diagrams of three- dimensional structures feature prominently in Arakawa’s painting from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s. Then, working with poet and philosopher Madeline Gins, he redirected his energies to ‘reversible destiny architecture’, a term coined by them to describe an idealistic, utopian architecture. Arakawa’s drawings in this exhibition are from his transitional period, when he was beginning to think about the potential of architecture.

Giulio Paolini (b. 1940, Genoa, Italy) and Calvino maintained a close relationship. The two were united by a common interest in the space of the mind and its representation. While Calvino approached it from a narrative perspective Paolini questioned it visually. Their exchange was premised on conceptual grounds and it brought to the fore how space could be envisioned and mapped. In this exhibition the notion of mental space will be explored in connection with the idea of imagined city.

Calvino’s ‘spider web’ city swings over an abyss, tied with ropes to two mountain tops, its precarious situation opposing gravity. Parallels can be drawn with Tomás Saraceno’s (b. 1973, San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) prototypes for floating cities. His hanging sculptures, including ‘IC 4970/M+W’ (2016) in the exhibition, are part of his long-term research project, Cloud Cities, which aims to develop a ‘modular and transnational city in the clouds’ that represents a model for sustainable and emancipatory building practices.

Flavia Frigeri is an Art Historian and Curator, currently Teaching Fellow in the History of Art department at University College London. Previously she served as a Curator, International Art (2014–16) and Assistant Curator (2011–14) at Tate Modern, where she worked on exhibitions, acquisitions and permanent collection displays. She co-curated (with Jessica Morgan) The World Goes Pop, a reassessment of pop art from a global perspective. Previous projects include Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, Paul Klee: Making Visible and Ruins in Reverse. From 2010 to 2011 she was the Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation’s Hilla Rebay International Fellow. She has written widely on: Post-war Italian Art, Pop Art, exhibition histories and contemporary art.


Waddington Custot, 11 Cork Street, London W1S 3LT
Dates: 7 March–4 May 2018
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday, 10am to 6pm Saturday: 10am to 4pm

For more information please visit: www.waddingtoncustot.com

Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

Multiple Modernisms

The Chrysler Museum of Art is pleased to announce Multiple Modernisms – an exhibition of modern and contemporary art that features the work by Arakawa, Untitled, 1963 (Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.). 

This reinstallation of the Chrysler Museum’s McKinnon Galleries highlights pieces in the Museum’s permanent collection through an examination of differing narratives about the history of modern and contemporary art. The exhibition shows similar approaches between artists, many who worked simultaneously or successively. It also explores contradictory ideas influenced by politics and socioeconomics. “Multiple Modernisms takes as its thesis that art history is messy. It is not one art practice progressing into another in a clear, straight manner. Instead, artists had different theories about what modern and contemporary was, what art should present to society and what impacts it could have. The exhibition also emphasizes that certain trends in art practice, such as representing the body or abstraction, were repeated in various manners throughout the 20th and 21st centuries,” said Kimberli Gant, Chrysler Museum’s McKinnon Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art.

Multiple Modernisms pairs internationally renowned artists like Jackson Pollock and Georgia O’Keeffe with those of local or regional acclaim like Norfolk artist Vic Pickett. The exhibition also showcases work by female artists, artists of color and artists from other countries. “I wanted this presentation to show the breadth and depth of the Museum’s collection. It was important to show there are alternate narratives to the history of contemporary art because not all artists or genres were or are embraced within the canon. Art history is fluid and constantly being revised. I want to highlight that,” said Gant.

Multiple Modernisms is guided by six themes including Sculpted Figures, The Gesture, Invoking Geometry, Refined Dynamism, Layered Perspectives and (Hyper) Reality. Sculpted Figures features three-dimensional interpretations of the human body. The Gesture presents works that emphasize the artist’s expressive mark on the canvas. In Invoking Geometry, viewers see images of shapes and patterns. Refined Dynamism focuses on works about movement within a restrained color palette, while Layered Perspectives presents artistic interpretations of major events, symbols, mythology and society.  (Hyper) Reality includes works presenting an extreme version of reality. “In organizing the exhibition by themes, viewers will see how artists were influenced by each other, created similar or conflicting perspectives on the same event and experimented with the same techniques or ideas across time and geography,” said Gant.

The modern and contemporary art exhibition opens November 16 at 6 p.m. with a 1960s-themed reception. The opening reception is free for members, $5 for all others.

For more information please visit: www.chrysler.org

Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1976), Totem, ca. 1970. Painted metal Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., 71.784 ©Alexander Calder Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Categories
Events Programs

Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology)

Join Reversible Destiny Foundation and Dillon + Lee in the film screening of Arakawa’s Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology) (1969) at Williamsburg’s National Sawdust.

Renowned for his paintings, drawings, prints, and visionary architectural constructions, Arakawa was one of the earliest practitioners of the international Conceptual Art movement of the 1960’s. His wide range of experimentation extended into
filmmaking. Why Not is a surrealistic exploration, by a young
female protagonist, of both her psychological and physical realms, shot entirely within an enclosed space of an apartment (Arakawa’s studio).

The screening is a rare opportunity to see it in full, in the backdrop of the innovative venue of National Sawdust.  The program is introduced by Miwako Tezuka, Consulting Curator of the Reversible Destiny Foundation and Diana Lee, partner of Dillon + Lee, and followed by a post-screening discussion and Q&A with Peter Katz, the Foundation’s Executive Director and Jay Sanders, Artists Space Executive Director and Chief Curator. 

Monday October 16, 7:00pm

National Sawdust
80 N 6th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11249

For tickets visit: nationalsawdust.org

Film written and directed by Arakawa
Narration: Madeline Gins
Cast: Mary Window
Music: Toshi Ichiyanagi 

110 minutes, 1969

7:00pm | Screening of Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology) 
9:00pm | Discussion & Q&A

Program Participants:


Peter Katz has led the Reversible Destiny Foundation
as Executive Director since 2015. He was previously the Chief Operating Officer at MoMA PS1 from 2011 to 2014 and also worked at the Neue Galerie, MoMA, and the Guggenheim in their finance and administration departments. 

 
Diana Seo Hyung Lee is a New York City based writer, translator, and partner of Dillon + Lee. Her writing and translations have appeared in Flash Art, The Brooklyn
Rail, ArtSlant, Degree Critical Blog,ArtAsiaPacific, Seaweed Journal, and The Forgetory, an online publication she helped start, where she currently serves as a contributing editor.

 
Jay Sanders is Director & Chief Curator of Artists Space in New York City. From 2012–2017 he was the Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance at the Whitney Museum of American Art. His recent exhibition Calder: Hypermobility is on view at the Whitney through October 23, 2017.
 
Miwako Tezuka is Consulting Curator of the Reversible Destiny Foundation since 2015. Formerly, she was Japan Society Gallery Director (2012–15) and Curator of Contemporary Art at Asia Society in New York (2005–12).
Dr. Tezuka is also Co-Director of PoNJA-GenKon, an international network of scholars and curators in the field of post-1945 Japanese art.

Click here to read article from Whitehot Magazine

Categories
Events Programs

Neon Dance: Puzzle Creature

Reversible Destiny Foundation is pleased to announce the World Premier of “Puzzle Creature” by Neon Dance, to be held on September 15 & 16 at Kamigo Clove Theater as one of the highlights of the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, Japan 2018.
 
Puzzle Creature, a term coined by Arakawa + Gins, refers to an organism’s constant questioning of its existence and surroundings; “Who or what are we as this species? Puzzle creatures to ourselves, we are visitations of inexplicability” – Madeline Gins and Arakawa, Architectural Body.

Through diverse meditations on this broader question, Neon Dance has created a beautiful and engaging work that leads us on an unforgettable journey.

For ticket reservation please visit: www.echigo-tsumari.jp

Dates

Saturday, September 15 2018
Sunday, September 16 2018
Start 18:00〜 pm.  / Open 17:30 pm.

Location
Echigo-Tsumari Kamigo Clove Theatre
7-3 Miyanohara, Kamigo, Tsunan-town, Nakauonumagun, Niigata

Cost
Adult JPY2500 (including tax) / Advance purchase JPY2000
ETAT2018 passport discount JPY2300 / Children age between 7 and 18 JPY1000

Dates

Saturday, September 15 2018

Sunday, September 16 2018

Start 18:00〜 pm.  / Open 17:30 pm.

Location

Echigo-Tsumari Kamigo Clove Theatre

7-3 Miyanohara, Kamigo, Tsunan-town, Nakauonumagun, Niigata

Cost

Adult JPY2500 (including tax) / Advance purchase JPY2000

ETAT2018 passport discount JPY2300 / Children age between 7 and 18 JPY1000

 

 

Choreographer: Adrienne Hart

Adrienne initially trained at Swindon Dance, winning a scholarship at the age of 17 to train at London Contemporary Dance School. She now works internationally as a choreographer and as Artistic Director of Neon Dance. Neon Dance is currently resident company at Swindon Dance (2017-19) and Adrienne is part of Sadler’s Wells Summer University programme (2015 – 2018), designed to support mid-career dance artists over a four-year period.

Adrienne has worked in Russia, Belgium, Norway, Germany, Kosovo, USA and Japan. Her work has been commissioned and supported by Arts Council England, British Council, Creative England, The Place, Modern Art Oxford, Glastonbury Festival, Art Front Gallery, DanceXchange and Pavilion Dance South West amongst others. Follow @ADRIENNE__HART

Performers: Luke Crook, Mariko Kida, Carys Staton
Music: Eliane Radigue, Sebastian Reynolds
Scenography: Numen / For Use
Costume / props: Ana Rajcevic
Sign language (English): Jemima Hoadley
Sign language (Japanese): Chisato Minamura

Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

ARAKAWA: SIX PAINTINGS

The Reversible Destiny Foundation and Gagosian are pleased to announce the exhibition of six paintings by Arakawa. 

The exhibition will be on view from May 2 through May 26th, 2017 at the Gagosian gallery at 555 West 24th Street, New York. 

Hours: Tue–Sat 10AM-6PM

 

VISIT WEBSITE

For further information please contact the gallery at newyork@gagosian.com or at +1.212.741.1111.

(Image: Arakawa, Texture of Time, 1977; Estate of Madeline Gins)

 
Categories
Programs Recent Exhibitions

Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971

The first major exhibition to explore the storied history of the groundbreaking mid-20th-century Dwan Gallery will premiere at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from September 30, 2016, through January 29, 2017. Honoring Virginia Dwan’s gift from her extraordinary personal collection to the National Gallery of Art, Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971 will be on view in Concourse galleries of the newly renovated East Building. The exhibition traces Dwan’s remarkable career as a gallerist and patron through some 100 works drawn from her collection as well as from museums and private collections. The exhibition includes Arakawa’s Untitled, “Stolen”, 1969, collection of Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford.

Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971 was organized by the National Gallery of Art. The exhibition travels to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where it will be on view from March 19 through September 10, 2017.

VISIT WEBSITE

Categories
Events Programs

Children Who Won’t Die

Reversible Destiny Foundation and Triple Canopy are pleased to present a screening of Children Who Won’t Die (2010). Directed by Nobu Yamaoka and scored by composer Keiichiro Shibuya, the documentary is a meditation on the work of Japanese artist Arakawa and his efforts, with his wife and creative partner Madeline Gins, to “reverse destiny” and free humanity from the necessity of death.

Children Who Won’t Die is part of Triple Canopy’s Vanitas issue, which explores contemporary meditations on mortality as well as the delights, delusions, and pressures of fleshly existence. The issue will also include an essay on the anti-death architecture of Arakawa and Gins by Triple Canopy senior editor Matthew Shen Goodman and Lucy Ives. The film is in Japanese with English subtitles, and will be introduced by Shen Goodman.

VISIT WEBSITE

 

November 3, 2016

7:00 p.m.

264 Canal Street, 3W, New York, New York

Free admission

Categories
Events Programs

Points of Convergence: Arakawa and the Art of 1960’s – 1970’s

Born in Nagoya, Japan, Arakawa rebelled as a Neo Dada artist in the late-1950’s Japanese art world. Fiercely independent and inspired by Marcel Duchamp’s “art in the service of the mind,” he moved to New York in 1961. This growing city of avant-garde experimentation attracted artists from all over the world; including many Japanese artists such as: Ay-O, On Kawara, Naoto Nakagawa, and Yoko Ono; whose paths crossed in life as well as participants in heated discussions about the nature and meaning of art. Living in the midst of this fast-changing scene of the 1960s and 70s, Arakawa along with these artists became an integral part of the emergence of Minimalism and Conceptual Art.

The panel discussion Points of Convergence invited distinguished speakers who brought to the table distinct perspectives into the art and philosophy of Arakawa and how they may be contextualized within the international art of the time. Dr. Charles Haxthausen has authored key texts for deciphering often-cryptic art of the artist by applying not only art-historical but also philosophical analyses. The painter Naoto Nakagawa became acquainted with Arakawa in 1965, recalled times spent in the fellowship of like-minded artists from Japan and beyond. Dr. Reiko Tomii, with her in-depth knowledge of postwar Japanese art history, keenly detects what changed and what remained constant in the art of Arakawa during the two decades that thrust him into the world.

In collaboration with Asia Contemporary Art Week and hosted by Artnet, this event launches Reversible Destiny Foundation’s series of public programs.

Points of Convergence: Arakawa and the Art of 1960s – 1970s

Panelists:

Charles “Mark” Haxthausen is Robert Sterling Clark Professor of Emeritus of Art History at Williams College, where he taught from 1993 to 2016. During that time he served for fourteen years as director of the Williams College/Clark Art Institute Graduate Program in the History of Art. Professor Haxthausen has played a significant international role as a curator and consultant in the field of modern and contemporary German art. Known for his work on Paul Klee, he has published numerous articles on German artists and critics. He edited the book The Two Art Histories: The Museum and the University and co-edited Berlin: Culture and Metropolis. His exhibition, Sol LeWitt: The Well-Tempered Grid, presented at the Williams College Museum of Art in 2012, won the Association of Art Museum Curators’ award of excellence for the Outstanding Exhibition in a University Museum in North America. His book, Carl Einstein: Refiguring Visuality, is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press.

Naoto Nakagawa was born in Kobe, Japan in 1944 and in 1962 he immigrated to New York City. His paintings have been widely exhibited, starting in 1968 at the legendary avant-garde Judson Gallery and recently at Feature, Inc. in New York. A two-part survey of Nakagawa’s work was mounted with his early work at White Box and his current work at Ethan Cohen Fine Arts. His work is included in many public and private collections including the New York Museum of Modern Art. He has taught at Columbia University and Parsons School of Design.


Dr. Reiko Tomii is an independent art historian, who investigates post-1945 Japanese art in global and local contexts. Her research topic encompasses “international contemporaneity,” collectivism, and conceptualism in 1960s art, as demonstrated by her contribution to Global Conceptualism (Queens Museum of Art, 1999), Century City (Tate Modern, 2001), and Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art (Getty Research Institute, 2007). Her book, Radicalism in the Wilderness: International Contemporaneity and 1960s Art in Japan, was published from MIT Press in Spring 2016.

The program was moderated by Dr. Miwako Tezuka, Consulting Curator of Reversible Destiny Foundation.
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Events Programs

Work in Progress – Explorations of Arakawa + Gins

Lecture series at gallery Art Unlimited
October 21, 22, 28, 2016

Organized by gallery ART UNLIMITED, ARAKAWA + GINS Tokyo Office (Coordinologist, Inc.)

In Cooperation with The Institute of Oriental and Occidental Studies – KANSAI UNIVERSITY / Reversible Destiny Foundation

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Programs Recent Exhibitions

The Eye of Arturo Schwarz

At Frieze Masters, 2016, Eykyn Maclean presented The Eye of Arturo Schwarz, an homage to the legendary gallerist and the eponymous Galleria Schwarz, which operated in Milan from 1954-1975.  The gallery became a cultural center in Milan, as Schwarz not only introduced Italy to the avant-garde art of Dada and Surrealism, but also discovered, promoted, and exhibited emerging artists such as Tano Festa, Enrico Baj, and Shusaku Arakawa.  The gallery, originally a bookshop, held regular poetry readings and was frequented by artists who considered it a haven for artistic discussion and debate.  Galleria Schwarz was one of the most prominent galleries in Europe after the war, and left a void beyond the Italian art market when it closed in 1975. 

To help recreate the atmosphere of Galleria Schwarz, all works in this exhibition were either shown at the gallery or are by artists whose work Schwarz exhibited. Works included paintings, sculpture, original catalogues from past Schwarz exhibitions, as well as books of poetry published by Schwarz.  

2016 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Dada movement and the 50th anniversary of Schwarz’s seminal exhibition of the same theme.

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